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CSCU9Z7 Honours Projects Autumn/Spring 2017-18
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Syllabus 2017-18

Overview

The Honours project is a substantial, individual piece of work carried out by the student over a two semester period (Autumn/Spring), usually including preparatory work during the preceding Summer break. Although the project is often the systematic development of a software application, it could also be a technology comparison, or more innovative or experimental research work (possibly in collaboration with one of the Division's research teams). Projects are supervised by members of the Division's teaching staff. The project gives the student the opportunity to demonstrate and consolidate previously acquired skills and knowledge, increasing the grasp of these. It is also important for developing the ability to communicate ideas effectively. Planning and organisation of time is essential since the project is a large part of the final year.

Coordinator

  • Dr Jingpeng Li

Credits

  • 60 credits at SCQF level 10
  • Normally this is taken as 20 credits (="one module") in the Autumn semester and 40 credits in the following Spring semester (="two modules")

Learning Outcomes

Students will learn:

  • to conduct a substantial and largely independent piece of work in a professional manner
  • to document and verbally present such work
  • an understanding of research methods
  • transferable skills in:
    • undertaking supervised work
    • applying research methods
    • verbal and written communication

Contents

This module is mandatory for Honours students in Computing Science. Project work is important for a number of reasons. It requires use of previously acquired skills and knowledge, increasing the grasp of these. It is also important to develop the ability to communicate ideas effectively. Planning and organisation of time is essential since the project is a large part of the final year.

The dissertation topic will be supervised by a member of the Division's staff, and will therefore be agreed with this supervisor. Throughout the project it is necessary to maintain regular contact with the supervisor. Typically this requires weekly meetings.

Honours projects in Computing Science are available in various single and combined Honours degree programmes, each designated by the code CSCU9Z7. The topic of the project must match the intended degree. As examples:

  • A Business Computing project might design, implement and evaluate an IT solution for some business problem (e.g. customer relationship management for a particular company).
  • A Computing Science project might design, implement and evaluate novel algorithms for a scientific problem (e.g. analysing disease spread), or might design, implement and evaluate a substantial software solution in an applied area.
  • An Information System project might design, implement and evaluate an information system to improve organisational effectiveness (e.g. managing collective meeting schedules for a particular organisation).
  • A Software Engineering project might design, implement and evaluate a substantial software solution for a problem that is not well supported currently (e.g. a tool for creating Internet telephony services).
  • An Applied Computing project might design, implement and evaluate a substantial software solution in an applied area. This could be a business problem, an information system, an educational/scientific application, ....

Where a project extends a previous one, it is particularly important to distinguish the work of the new project from what has been previously undertaken.

Where a project is comparative in nature, e.g. assessing the strengths and weaknesses of different packages or methodologies, it is important to establish in advance clear criteria for the comparison.

Required deliverables and activities

During the project, the student is required to complete the following deliverable components/activities:

  • Preliminary report (Spring)
  • Interim report: Problem identification and analysis, and state of the art survey (mid Autumn)
  • Poster (mid Autumn) - including attendance at poster session
  • Interim demonstration (late Autumn)
  • Final presentation (Spring)
  • Final dissertation (Spring) + code
  • Final demonstration (Spring)
  • A project workbook
  • Brief report on a Division research seminar (Autumn or Spring)

The student is also required to submit an electronic copy of their project source code and other materials.

Non-submission/completion of any single item of required work will result in the award of No Mark for the module as a whole. If you cannot meet a deadline and have good cause, please see the coordinator to explain your situation and ask for an extension. Coursework will be accepted up to seven days after the hand-in deadline (or expiry of any agreed extension) but the mark will be lowered by three marks per day or part thereof. After seven days the work will be deemed a non-submission and will receive No Mark.

Prescribed classes

In this module the prescribed classes are the project training seminars, and the division research seminars (as allocated). Failure to attend at least two-thirds of prescribed classes will result in the module mark being capped at a maximum of 40 for the module, unless good cause for missing those classes can be shown. Responsibility for showing good cause lies with the student.

Assessment

Projects last for two semesters and count as the equivalent of three standard modules, being assessed entirely by Computing Science. Assessment is based on:
  • interim report (10%)
  • demonstration (10%)
  • final report (80%)

Note that a pass in this module is mandatory for completion of an Honours degree in Computing Science. The project may not be passed By Compensation, although the Examiners may allow a student to re-write and re-submit their dissertation if a fail mark is obtained.


Updated 11/09/17 22:25
Module coordinator    Email - Room 4B95 - Tel 01786 467450
Mail Computing Science and Mathematics, Faculty of Natural Sciences,
University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland, FK9 4LA
Scottish Charity No: SC011159