COMPUTING SCIENCE
AND MATHEMATICS


Modules | CSCU9V4 | Syllabus CSCU9V4 | Syllabus Updated 11/01/17 15:50
CSCU9V4 - Systems Spring 2017
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Organisation

Materials

Assessment

Reference

 

Home

Organisation

Materials

Assessment

Reference

 

Syllabus

CSC9V4: 22 credits at SCQF level 8

Lecturers Dr Marwan Fayed (Coordinator), Room 4B72
Prof Leslie Smith, Room 4B87

Prerequisites

CSC9A3; Strongly encouraged is MAT911. The emphasis of this module is on understanding ‘lower-level’ challenges, components, as well as their interactions, architectures, and algorithms.

Credit

20 credits at SCQF level 8

Learning Outcomes

  • Working knowledge of the C programming language
  • Imparting knowledge of systems and hardware required for working with computer systems
  • Develop a confidence in programming with exposure to lower-level systems details
  • Gaining a basic knowledge of the organisation of operating systems

Students will be required to demonstrate the ability to apply theory and techniques to unseen problems without reference to notes, and to work independently and under a time constraint.

Contents Basics of C, and details it exposes:
  • Syntax and sentences
  • Pass by value vs pass by reference
  • Pointers and manipulations
  • Memory management
  • Header files, structs, and basics of Make (time permitting)
  • (Potentially) Shifts and masks

Computer Organisation
  • Data representation (binary, hex, decimal)
  • Binary arithmetic
  • Architecture: cpu architecture, memory hierarchy, byte-ordering
  • I/O
  • Storage formats: disk, ssd, optical

Micro-architeture and Digital Logic
  • Basics of gates and microcodes
  • Intro to assembly

O/S Introduction
  • Components of an O/S
  • Kernel vs user-space, and protection issues
  • Processes and threads
  • CPU Scheduling, synchronisation, deadlocks
  • MM/VMM: paging and segmentation
  • File systems (time permitting)

Recommended Textbooks and Reading
  • Tanenbaum, "Structured Computer Organisation," 4th, 5th, or 5th edition.
  • Silberschatz, Galvin, Gagne, "Operating Systems Concepts", 4th, 5th, or 6th ed.
  • C Reference: Plenty of free materials online. Suggestions here.
Assessment
  • Practical Checkpoints (10%)
  • Assignment (40%)
  • Examination (50%)
Module requirements

To be eligible to pass the module, students must:

  • Submit all assignment work;
  • Sit the examination.

If you do not fulfil the requirements you will be awarded grade X for the module. [See paragraph 61 of the Undergraduate Regulations on Assessment]

Coursework extensions

Students who can show good cause may be permitted extensions to coursework deadlines. "Good cause" may include illness, for which a medical certificate or other evidence will be required. Students must request an extension by contacting the module coordinator, supplying relevant evidence, no later than seven days after the published assignment deadline. Extensions will be granted for acceptable reasons only, and will not normally be beyond such time as solutions and feedback are returned to the rest of the class. [See Section 6.2.6 of the Academic Policy Handbook]

Late submission of coursework

Coursework that is submitted late will be accepted up to seven days after the published deadline (or expiry of any agreed extension) but the mark will be lowered by three marks per day or part thereof. After seven days the piece of work will be deemed a non-submission. [See paragraph 66-68 of the Undergraduate Regulations on Assessment]

Repeat assessments

Students who fulfil the module requirements, but obtain an overall fail mark (0-39) are eligible for repeat assessment. In most cases, this will be a repeat class test. Repeats are not permitted for laboratory checkpoints or group work. The mark following any repeat assessment is capped at 40.

Discretionary repeat assessments

In exceptional circumstances, a student who has not met all the module requirements, following the Main examination period, may be permitted a discretionary repeat. This may be a repeat class test. Repeats are not permitted for laboratory checkpoints or group work. The mark following any repeat assessment is capped at 40. If you are granted a discretionary repeat assessment but do not attempt it, you will be awarded grade X for the module.

In deciding whether to grant a discretionary repeat, the Examiners will consider your record of attendance and engagement in the module. Students with a poor attendance record will not normally be permitted a discretionary repeat.

Attendance recording

Attendance at practical classes will be recorded. If you are unable to attend any class, please submit a self-certification of absence via the Portal, if appropriate. <-- The University has a policy of monitoring attendance. Repeated absence will be followed up in order to identify any problems at an early stage and to offer students appropriate support.-->

 

Computing Science & Mathematics, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland, FK9 4LA
Web www.cs.stir.ac.uk/~lss - Tel 01786 467454
Email dec@cs.stir.ac.uk
Tel 01786 467445